How to Make Raw Stuffing

The holidays are coming fast and before you know it there will be parties to attend and meals to be made. Here are a few ideas that will help in the kitchen.

Raw stuffing Stuffing can be made from raw croutons instead of the traditional baked white bread.

Ingredients:
2 cups celery, cut in 1/4 inch slices
2 cups Sprouted Raw croutons
1 1/2 cups zucchini, small cubes
1/2 cup sunflower seeds (soaked)
1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, minced
2 teaspoons fresh thyme, minced
1 teaspoon rubbed sage
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon nama shoyu, or Tamari

Preparation:

Place the croutons in a dish with some water where they are able to rehydrate (not drowning in water as they will lose their herbs/taste) once moist then add to the mix. The final stuffing mix (before dehydration) should be mushy not too wet but not dry.

To create more of a uniform consistency ground the sunflower seeds.

Mix ingredients and stir well to coat evenly. All raw foods/recipe should be prepared at or below 115º F to be raw, (if you go much higher than that it may start to destroy enzymes, vitamins & minerals.  Warm up the dehydrator for 10-15min and then put the food in, (each size dehydrator takes different time to warm up to the specified temperature and without the warm up, part of the dehydrating time will be the dehydrator catching up.

If using a regular oven, the oven door needs to stay open while ‘cooking’ as many regular ovens start at 175º F (too hot to be raw). It is difficult to gauge the temperature doing it this way, it can be done but it may end up being cooked after all. If you have a toaster oven that goes to 100º F then it may work.

Heat the food for about an hour. Stir occasionally. Serve immediately or store in an airtight container for up to 4 days.

Let us know how this recipe turns out for you! We’d love to see a pic posted on our Facebook page.

Tips on Eating Out with Dietary Restrictions

When making social plans with friends it’s always great to catch up or hang out over food. What do you do when you have a food allergy or dietary restriction? Here’s a video we found with some very helpful tips!

1. Plan ahead with menus and locations

2. Ask questions – don’t be afraid to make sure all the ingredients meet your standards. If they don’t be prepared to ask for substitutions.

3. Have a back up plan and be prepared to go to another establishment

4. When all else fails – have a snack with you.

Hopefully the person you’re meeting up with is aware of your dietary needs and understands the steps you go through. Perhaps they are in the same boat! Either way, it’s important to plan ahead to avoid discomfort and unexpected reactions to inappropriate food.

How do you plan?

How to Make a Raw Apple Pie

Just in time for Thanksgiving, here’s a video recipe of Ani Phyo making an apple pie – RAW!

What an easy recipe that can be done in no time. In case you didn’t catch that part at the end – Ani’s tip to soften the apples was to let them sit for 24 hours. Great to make quickly and fun for children to participate as well. Always nice to have a raw food dessert that won’t induce guilt. Also, this really shows how much fun raw food can be, not just twigs and berries, raw food is so full of variety!

We’d love to hear how your version of this pie worked out – did you pinch the crust?

Find Ani’s books here: http://goo.gl/2oh4z

 

 

 

How to grow Wheatgrass

In anticipation of Steve Sproutman Meyerowitz coming to Toronto (Nov. 25), we though to show you a video of a small part of Steve’s love of growing healthy greens. In the clip below Steve is talking about how to grow Wheatgrass using his stackable trays and he mentions his book: Wheatgrass: Nature’s Finest Medicine.

It’s incredible just how easy it is to grow greens hydroponically and without the mess of mold. The best part is when he mentions stack the trays to the sky, he certainly has a good senes of humour. Sprouting, growing and cultivating herbs is a great way to save your money and feed your body healthy foods. There are so many herbs/sprouts that offer not only great taste, but beneficial properties it’s impossible to capture all in one blog post. We invite you to read up on the subject, see what suits your needs and what would fit appropriately in your life. Are you the next Sproutman/woman? Have you had adventures in sprouting/growing? We’d love to hear about it below.